Druze dating

We have family members all over the world, and the idea that someone would inflame any part of that world for the sole reason of selling papers should be criminal.: For some reason, other news outlets around the Web (mostly outside of its native U.K.) routinely cite the site’s reporting as though it were a credible news source rather than a shameless, traffic-whoring gossip factory.The Druze, also known as the "Sons of Grace," are a secretive, tightly-knit religious sect whose origins can be traced to Egypt a thousand years ago.They believe that God was incarnated on earth in the form of their leader, al-Hakim bi-Amrih Alla. Thus, many of them migrated to the isolated mountains of Lebanon, Syria, and Israel, while others settled throughout the Middle East. They are largely of Arab descent but they also have Iranian, Kurdish, and European heritage.

[Religious Mysteries: 8 Alleged Relics of Jesus] According to legend, the shroud was secretly carried from Judea in A. 30 or 33, and was housed in Edessa, Turkey, and Constantinople (the name for Istanbul before the Ottomans took over) for centuries. So geologists have argued that an earthquake at Jesus' death could have released a burst of neutrons.

Little scholarly study has been done on the Druze, and much of what is available has not been translated into English.

The Druze themselves are reluctant to share information about their faith or their culture with outsiders, primarily because of the fear of persecution.

"We cannot say anything more on its origin." The new findings don't rule out either the notion that the long strip of linen is a medieval forgery or that it's the true burial shroud of Jesus Christ, the researchers said. 1390, lending credence to the notion that it was an elaborate fake created in the Middle Ages.

Long-standing debate On its face, the Shroud of Turin is an unassuming piece of twill cloth that bears traces of blood and a darkened imprint of a man's body. However, the Catholic Church only officially recorded its existence in A. 1353, when it showed up in a tiny church in Lirey, France. (Isotopes are forms of an element with a different number of neutrons.) But critics argued that the researchers used patched-up portions of the cloth to date the samples, which could have been much younger than the rest of the garment.